Ten Tips on Writing from David Ogilvy

10 Tips on Writing from David Ogilvy

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“Never write more than two pages on any subject.”

How is your new year’s resolution to read more and write better holding up? After tracing the fascinating story of the most influential writing style guide of all time and absorbing advice on writing from some of modern history’s most legendary writers, here comes some priceless and pricelessly uncompromising wisdom from a very different kind of cultural legend: iconic businessman and original “Mad Man” David Ogilvy. On September 7th, 1982, Ogilvy sent the following internal memo to all agency employees, titled “How to Write”:

The better you write, the higher you go in Ogilvy & Mather. People who think well, write well.

Woolly minded people write woolly memos, woolly letters and woolly speeches.

Good writing is not a natural gift. You have to learn to write well. Here are 10 hints:

1. Read the Roman-Raphaelson book on writing. Read it three times.

2. Write the way you talk. Naturally.

3. Use short words, short sentences and short paragraphs.

4. Never use jargon words like reconceptualize, demassification, attitudinally, judgmentally. They are hallmarks of a pretentious ass.

5. Never write more than two pages on any subject.

6. Check your quotations.

7. Never send a letter or a memo on the day you write it. Read it aloud the next morning — and then edit it.

8. If it is something important, get a colleague to improve it.

9. Before you send your letter or your memo, make sure it is crystal clear what you want the recipient to do.

10. If you want ACTION, don’t write. Go and tell the guy what you want.

David

This, and much more of Ogilvy’s timeless advice, can be found in The Unpublished David Ogilvy: A Selection of His Writings from the Files of His Partners, a fine addition to my favorite famous correspondence. The book is long out of print, but you can snag a copy with some rummaging through Amazon’s second-hand copies or your favorite used bookstore.

WORK ON A COMPUTER THAT IS NOT CONNECTED TO THE INTERNET!!!

BEST. ADVICE. EVER.

^ed

Ten Tips on Writing from David Ogilvy

10 Tips on Writing from David Ogilvy

by

“Never write more than two pages on any subject.”

How is your new year’s resolution to read more and write better holding up? After tracing the fascinating story of the most influential writing style guide of all time and absorbing advice on writing from some of modern history’s most legendary writers, here comes some priceless and pricelessly uncompromising wisdom from a very different kind of cultural legend: iconic businessman and original “Mad Man” David Ogilvy. On September 7th, 1982, Ogilvy sent the following internal memo to all agency employees, titled “How to Write”:

The better you write, the higher you go in Ogilvy & Mather. People who think well, write well.

Woolly minded people write woolly memos, woolly letters and woolly speeches.

Good writing is not a natural gift. You have to learn to write well. Here are 10 hints:

1. Read the Roman-Raphaelson book on writing. Read it three times.

2. Write the way you talk. Naturally.

3. Use short words, short sentences and short paragraphs.

4. Never use jargon words like reconceptualize, demassification, attitudinally, judgmentally. They are hallmarks of a pretentious ass.

5. Never write more than two pages on any subject.

6. Check your quotations.

7. Never send a letter or a memo on the day you write it. Read it aloud the next morning — and then edit it.

8. If it is something important, get a colleague to improve it.

9. Before you send your letter or your memo, make sure it is crystal clear what you want the recipient to do.

10. If you want ACTION, don’t write. Go and tell the guy what you want.

David

This, and much more of Ogilvy’s timeless advice, can be found in The Unpublished David Ogilvy: A Selection of His Writings from the Files of His Partners, a fine addition to my favorite famous correspondence. The book is long out of print, but you can snag a copy with some rummaging through Amazon’s second-hand copies or your favorite used bookstore.

WORK ON A COMPUTER THAT IS NOT CONNECTED TO THE INTERNET!!!

BEST. ADVICE. EVER.

^ed

Entrez Programming Utilities Help – NCBI Bookshelf -E-utiility news from the NIH

E-utility News

  • Alternative version 2.0 DocSums now available from ESummary

  • EFetch 2.0 to be released on February 15, 2012

  • Please see the Release Notes for details and changes.

The Entrez Programming Utilities (E-utilities) are a set of eight server-side programs that provide a stable interface into the Entrez query and database system at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). The E-utilities use a fixed URL syntax that translates a standard set of input parameters into the values necessary for various NCBI software components to search for and retrieve the requested data. The E-utilities are therefore the structured interface to the Entrez system, which currently includes 38 databases covering a variety of biomedical data, including nucleotide and protein sequences, gene records, three-dimensional molecular structures, and the biomedical literature.

Contents

Entrez Programming Utilities Help – NCBI Bookshelf -E-utiility news from the NIH

E-utility News

  • Alternative version 2.0 DocSums now available from ESummary

  • EFetch 2.0 to be released on February 15, 2012

  • Please see the Release Notes for details and changes.

The Entrez Programming Utilities (E-utilities) are a set of eight server-side programs that provide a stable interface into the Entrez query and database system at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). The E-utilities use a fixed URL syntax that translates a standard set of input parameters into the values necessary for various NCBI software components to search for and retrieve the requested data. The E-utilities are therefore the structured interface to the Entrez system, which currently includes 38 databases covering a variety of biomedical data, including nucleotide and protein sequences, gene records, three-dimensional molecular structures, and the biomedical literature.

Contents

EdTech Notebook: CoSN Picks Districts for ‘Transformation’ Project – Digital Education – Education Week

EdTech Notebook: CoSN Picks Districts for ‘Transformation’ Project

By Ian Quillen on July 13, 2012 12:24 PM

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The Consortium for School Networking this week announced the 19 school districts nationwide that it will partner with for its “Teaming for Transformation” initiative, a collaboration intended to help expedite and refine the transition of schools across the country to digital classrooms, according to a press release.

The collaborative will meet periodically online through the epic-ed Web community slated to launch in August, convene for a visit to the digitaly converted Mooresville Graded School District in North Carolina, and link up again at CoSN’s annual conference in 2013, the release says.

Of the 19 participating districts, there are three each from Indiana and Illinois, and two from Alabama and Texas.

• Meanwhile, the State Educational Technology Directors Association have elected two new board members to join its board of directors. Peter Drescher, the education technology coordinator for the Vermont education department, and Neill Kimrey, his counterpart from the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, join the nine-member board.

• And on the online learning front, the Florida Virtual School this week launched its most recent professional development course, its first focusing exclusively on a blended learning model.

“Teaching in a Blended Model” is the fourth course in the school’s “Teach Online Series,” and may be purchased by any teacher or schools wishing to enroll. The series is an extension of the school’s internal professional development operations, something Florida Virtual and other online schools have had to develop for years in lieu of dependable outside training for future online teachers.

EdTech Notebook: CoSN Picks Districts for ‘Transformation’ Project – Digital Education – Education Week

EdTech Notebook: CoSN Picks Districts for ‘Transformation’ Project

By Ian Quillen on July 13, 2012 12:24 PM

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The Consortium for School Networking this week announced the 19 school districts nationwide that it will partner with for its “Teaming for Transformation” initiative, a collaboration intended to help expedite and refine the transition of schools across the country to digital classrooms, according to a press release.

The collaborative will meet periodically online through the epic-ed Web community slated to launch in August, convene for a visit to the digitaly converted Mooresville Graded School District in North Carolina, and link up again at CoSN’s annual conference in 2013, the release says.

Of the 19 participating districts, there are three each from Indiana and Illinois, and two from Alabama and Texas.

• Meanwhile, the State Educational Technology Directors Association have elected two new board members to join its board of directors. Peter Drescher, the education technology coordinator for the Vermont education department, and Neill Kimrey, his counterpart from the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, join the nine-member board.

• And on the online learning front, the Florida Virtual School this week launched its most recent professional development course, its first focusing exclusively on a blended learning model.

“Teaching in a Blended Model” is the fourth course in the school’s “Teach Online Series,” and may be purchased by any teacher or schools wishing to enroll. The series is an extension of the school’s internal professional development operations, something Florida Virtual and other online schools have had to develop for years in lieu of dependable outside training for future online teachers.

More Focus on Psychological Impact of Digital Media? – Digital Education – Education Week

More Focus on Psychological Impact of Digital Media?

By Ian Quillen on June 1, 2012 5:45 PM

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Much focus in the debate over how to weave technology into education is on whether tech-based teaching methods can more effectively impart students with the skills we believe are essential than traditional methods.

But as our discussion becomes more sophisticated, expect to see more stories like we’ve seen this week, asking questions about the emotional and psychological impact of learning via digital media.

A story in Tuesday’s Sydney Morning Herald in Australia suggests that overexposure to devices such as tablet computers and smartphones, particularly at a young age, can lead to obsession or addiction, according to several mental health professionals.

At the same time, they say, suggestions on how much (or little) screen time children should spend are overly stringent and unrealistic, compounding the problem for parents and teachers trying to discern how much tech time is healthy, and how much is obsessive.

Meanwhile, in an opinion piece on our sister website, Education Week Teacher, Paul Barnwell says his own enthusiasm for many uses of educational technology has waned as the novelty wore off and students became overstimulated and distracted.

Barnwell cautions that not all uses of educational technology should be abandoned, but he favors the use of technology for student creation and production rather than instructional delivery.

And even a recent study of children age 3-6 and their reading comprehension suggests that while they are equally able to gain comprehension from both e-books and their print equivalent, they are more easily distracted when reading the e-book.

As we’ve seen with fully online and blended learning, don’t be surprised if the line also blurs between between student learning and student mental health. For example, the debate could turn to which mental-health impact is greater: the positives of improved education and thus the potential for a more successful life, or the negatives of an increasing pull toward a virtual world and away from person-to-person interaction.