EXCLUSIVE: FBI Raids Homes of Suspected ‘Anonymous’ Hackers

The FBI executed search warrants at the New York homes of three suspected members of notorious hacking group Anonymous early Tuesday morning, FoxNews.com has learned.”,
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EXCLUSIVE: FBI Raids Homes of Suspected ‘Anonymous’ Hackers

  • baldwin FBI Raids NYC

    July 19, 2011: FBI agents execute a search warrant at the Long Island, NY, home of a suspected member of notorious hacking group Anonymous. (Fox News)

The FBI executed search warrants at the New York homes of three suspected members of notorious hacking group Anonymous early Tuesday morning, FoxNews.com has learned.

More than 10 FBI agents arrived at the Baldwin, N.Y., home of Giordani Jordan at 6:00 a.m. EST with a search warrant for computers and computer-related accessories, removing at least one laptop from the premises.

The agents spent an hour and 40 minutes at Jordan’s house; other agents investigated a second Long Island, N.Y., home and one in Brooklyn, N.Y., sources told FoxNews.com.

Jordan’s system was identified as allegedly being used in a coordinated distributed denial of service attack against several companies, a law enforcement official told FoxNews.com.

The targets of the FBI searches are all in their late teens to early 20s. 

Tuesday’s search warrants were part of an ongoing investigation into Anonymous, which claimed responsibility for attacks against a variety of websites including Visa and Mastercard. Anonymous is a loose collection of cybersavvy activists inspired by WikiLeaks and its flamboyant head Julian Assange to fight for “Internet freedom” — along the way defacing websites, shutting down servers, and scrawling messages across screens web-wide.

A tweet purportedly from the hacker group sent out around 2 a.m. Tuesday morning — following the Monday defacement of the website for British newspaper The Sun — trumpeted “We had an awesome day, loud hail to all #AntiSec vessels: We are winning.”

Another Twitter feed purportedly connected to the Anonymous group issued a defiant message Tuesday morning in response to the FBI’s action: “It doesn’t matter how many people the ‘FBI’ arrest. Whether they are core members or not. #anonymous have started something unstoppable.”

The Anonymous vigilante group turned its efforts to the Arizona police department in late June, posting personal information of law officers and hacking and defacing websites in response, the group claims, to the state’s controversial SB1070 immigration law.

While Anonymous is largely a politically motivated organization, splinter group LulzSec — which dominated headlines in the spring for a similar streak of cyberattacks — was largely in it for the thrills.

The metropolitan police in London arrested the first alleged member of the LulzSec group on June 20, a 19-year-old teen named Ryan Cleary. Subsequent sweeps through Italy and Switzerland in early July led to the arrests of 15 more people — all between the ages of 15 and 28 years old.

The two groups are responsible for a broad spate of digital break-ins targeting governments and large corporations, including Japanese technology giant Sony, the U.S. Senate, telecommunications giant AT&T, Fox.com, and other government and private entities.

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EXCLUSIVE: FBI Raids Homes of Suspected ‘Anonymous’ Hackers

The FBI executed search warrants at the New York homes of three suspected members of notorious hacking group Anonymous early Tuesday morning, FoxNews.com has learned.”,
baynoteOrOutbrain:”outbrain”,
commenting: “true”
};
var disqus_identifier = “c076e13bc7184310VgnVCM100000d7c1a8c0RCRD”;
var disqus_category_id = “462129”;
var disqus_developer = 1;

EXCLUSIVE: FBI Raids Homes of Suspected ‘Anonymous’ Hackers

  • baldwin FBI Raids NYC

    July 19, 2011: FBI agents execute a search warrant at the Long Island, NY, home of a suspected member of notorious hacking group Anonymous. (Fox News)

The FBI executed search warrants at the New York homes of three suspected members of notorious hacking group Anonymous early Tuesday morning, FoxNews.com has learned.

More than 10 FBI agents arrived at the Baldwin, N.Y., home of Giordani Jordan at 6:00 a.m. EST with a search warrant for computers and computer-related accessories, removing at least one laptop from the premises.

The agents spent an hour and 40 minutes at Jordan’s house; other agents investigated a second Long Island, N.Y., home and one in Brooklyn, N.Y., sources told FoxNews.com.

Jordan’s system was identified as allegedly being used in a coordinated distributed denial of service attack against several companies, a law enforcement official told FoxNews.com.

The targets of the FBI searches are all in their late teens to early 20s. 

Tuesday’s search warrants were part of an ongoing investigation into Anonymous, which claimed responsibility for attacks against a variety of websites including Visa and Mastercard. Anonymous is a loose collection of cybersavvy activists inspired by WikiLeaks and its flamboyant head Julian Assange to fight for “Internet freedom” — along the way defacing websites, shutting down servers, and scrawling messages across screens web-wide.

A tweet purportedly from the hacker group sent out around 2 a.m. Tuesday morning — following the Monday defacement of the website for British newspaper The Sun — trumpeted “We had an awesome day, loud hail to all #AntiSec vessels: We are winning.”

Another Twitter feed purportedly connected to the Anonymous group issued a defiant message Tuesday morning in response to the FBI’s action: “It doesn’t matter how many people the ‘FBI’ arrest. Whether they are core members or not. #anonymous have started something unstoppable.”

The Anonymous vigilante group turned its efforts to the Arizona police department in late June, posting personal information of law officers and hacking and defacing websites in response, the group claims, to the state’s controversial SB1070 immigration law.

While Anonymous is largely a politically motivated organization, splinter group LulzSec — which dominated headlines in the spring for a similar streak of cyberattacks — was largely in it for the thrills.

The metropolitan police in London arrested the first alleged member of the LulzSec group on June 20, a 19-year-old teen named Ryan Cleary. Subsequent sweeps through Italy and Switzerland in early July led to the arrests of 15 more people — all between the ages of 15 and 28 years old.

The two groups are responsible for a broad spate of digital break-ins targeting governments and large corporations, including Japanese technology giant Sony, the U.S. Senate, telecommunications giant AT&T, Fox.com, and other government and private entities.

LulzSec, Anonymous ignites global cyberwar to expose governments. Who’s next? – International Business Times

By |
June 20, 2011 5:26 PM EDT

LulzSec’s influence has been attracting partnerships as the hacker group “Anonymous” joined forces in a recent announcement.  The two groups are now setting eyes to expose global government websites as the hackers have ignited a cyber war campaign. 

The Anonymous hacker group has a history of hacking government sites such as the Tunisia censorship protest incident earlier this year.  At that time, Anonymous compiled a watchlist and strikes when corruption or issues with freedom arises. It is not clear what will determine the hacker group’s next target, but the US government may be on the top of the list.  A quote from an Anonymous hacker suggests that they are confident in breaching a majority of websites on their watchlist. 

“We have the capacity to eliminate the infrastructures of any and all government sites on our watchlist… The ones it can’t hack can simply be taken down with DDoS attacks,” wrote an Anoynymous hacker.

The recent activities have also sparked attention into how secure government sites really are as a string of successful hacks have exposed flaws in IT infrastructure.  According to the hackers, the  FBI and its related sites  are utilizing insufficient security tactics. 

After a weekend of hacking the Sega Pass Network, Lulzsec and Anonymous have added a new victim to its list, UK’s Serious Organized Crime Agency (SOCA).  SOCA published a statement saying,

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“SOCA has chosen to take its Web site offline to limit the impact of the distributed-denial-of-service (DDoS) attack on other clients hosted by our service provider…The SOCA Web site is a source of information for the general public which is hosted by an external provider. It is not linked to our operational material or the data we hold,” wrote the agency.

The string of targets have included video game corporations such as Sony, Sega and Government sites such as the CIA and US Senate.  The US recently announced that the country’s cyber security is at risk and has plans to tackle cyber terrorists with harsher punishments. 

LulzSec may not be highly affected by the recent US officials announcement as the hacker group continues their  parade of infiltration and government exposure.  Only time will tell until LulzSec and Anonymous reveal their next target. 

The hacker groups call for participation in the cyber hack movement as seen in LulzSec’s post on Pastebin.

Salutations Lulz Lizards,

As we’re aware, the government and whitehat security terrorists across the world continue to dominate and control our Internet ocean. Sitting pretty on cargo bays full of corrupt booty, they think it’s acceptable to condition and enslave all vessels in sight. Our Lulz Lizard battle fleet is now declaring immediate and unremitting war on the freedom-snatching moderators of 2011.

Welcome to Operation Anti-Security (#AntiSec) – we encourage any vessel, large or small, to open fire on any government or agency that crosses their path. We fully endorse the flaunting of the word “AntiSec” on any government website defacement or physical graffiti art. We encourage you to spread the word of AntiSec far and wide, for it will be remembered. To increase efforts, we are now teaming up with the Anonymous collective and all affiliated battleships.

Whether you’re sailing with us or against us, whether you hold past grudges or a burning desire to sink our lone ship, we invite you to join the rebellion. Together we can defend ourselves so that our privacy is not overrun by profiteering gluttons. Your hat can be white, gray or black, your skin and race are not important. If you’re aware of the corruption, expose it now, in the name of Anti-Security.

Top priority is to steal and leak any classified government information, including e-mail spools and documentation. Prime targets are banks and other high-ranking establishments. If they try to censor our progress, we will obliterate the censor with cannon fire anointed with lizard blood.

EXACTLY: WHO’S NEXT?

LulzSec, Anonymous ignites global cyberwar to expose governments. Who’s next? – International Business Times

By |
June 20, 2011 5:26 PM EDT

LulzSec’s influence has been attracting partnerships as the hacker group “Anonymous” joined forces in a recent announcement.  The two groups are now setting eyes to expose global government websites as the hackers have ignited a cyber war campaign. 

The Anonymous hacker group has a history of hacking government sites such as the Tunisia censorship protest incident earlier this year.  At that time, Anonymous compiled a watchlist and strikes when corruption or issues with freedom arises. It is not clear what will determine the hacker group’s next target, but the US government may be on the top of the list.  A quote from an Anonymous hacker suggests that they are confident in breaching a majority of websites on their watchlist. 

“We have the capacity to eliminate the infrastructures of any and all government sites on our watchlist… The ones it can’t hack can simply be taken down with DDoS attacks,” wrote an Anoynymous hacker.

The recent activities have also sparked attention into how secure government sites really are as a string of successful hacks have exposed flaws in IT infrastructure.  According to the hackers, the  FBI and its related sites  are utilizing insufficient security tactics. 

After a weekend of hacking the Sega Pass Network, Lulzsec and Anonymous have added a new victim to its list, UK’s Serious Organized Crime Agency (SOCA).  SOCA published a statement saying,

Follow us

“SOCA has chosen to take its Web site offline to limit the impact of the distributed-denial-of-service (DDoS) attack on other clients hosted by our service provider…The SOCA Web site is a source of information for the general public which is hosted by an external provider. It is not linked to our operational material or the data we hold,” wrote the agency.

The string of targets have included video game corporations such as Sony, Sega and Government sites such as the CIA and US Senate.  The US recently announced that the country’s cyber security is at risk and has plans to tackle cyber terrorists with harsher punishments. 

LulzSec may not be highly affected by the recent US officials announcement as the hacker group continues their  parade of infiltration and government exposure.  Only time will tell until LulzSec and Anonymous reveal their next target. 

The hacker groups call for participation in the cyber hack movement as seen in LulzSec’s post on Pastebin.

Salutations Lulz Lizards,

As we’re aware, the government and whitehat security terrorists across the world continue to dominate and control our Internet ocean. Sitting pretty on cargo bays full of corrupt booty, they think it’s acceptable to condition and enslave all vessels in sight. Our Lulz Lizard battle fleet is now declaring immediate and unremitting war on the freedom-snatching moderators of 2011.

Welcome to Operation Anti-Security (#AntiSec) – we encourage any vessel, large or small, to open fire on any government or agency that crosses their path. We fully endorse the flaunting of the word “AntiSec” on any government website defacement or physical graffiti art. We encourage you to spread the word of AntiSec far and wide, for it will be remembered. To increase efforts, we are now teaming up with the Anonymous collective and all affiliated battleships.

Whether you’re sailing with us or against us, whether you hold past grudges or a burning desire to sink our lone ship, we invite you to join the rebellion. Together we can defend ourselves so that our privacy is not overrun by profiteering gluttons. Your hat can be white, gray or black, your skin and race are not important. If you’re aware of the corruption, expose it now, in the name of Anti-Security.

Top priority is to steal and leak any classified government information, including e-mail spools and documentation. Prime targets are banks and other high-ranking establishments. If they try to censor our progress, we will obliterate the censor with cannon fire anointed with lizard blood.

EXACTLY: WHO’S NEXT?

Operation Anti-Security: LulzSec and Anonymous declare war on world’s governments – International Business Times

By Alastair Stevenson: Subscribe to Alastair’s

June 20, 2011 9:31 AM EDT

In a statement released over the weekend the hacker collective LulzSec has promised to unite with its 4Chan-born brother Anonymous in a new cyber campaign against the world’s governments.


  • (Photo: REUTERS)<br>British police officials revealed on Wednesday the arrest of an 18-yea-old teenager that authorities tagged as the mouthpiece of a hacking group identified as responsible for breaching the security protocols of Sony Pictures and a host of other websites.
  • (Photo: REUTERS)
    British police officials revealed on Wednesday the arrest of an 18-yea-old teenager that authorities tagged as the mouthpiece of a hacking group identified as responsible for breaching the security protocols of Sony Pictures and a host of other websites.

    Share This Story

    Codenamed Operation Anti-Security, the statement was originally released on the Pastbin website and has since been tweeted on LulzSec and Anonymous’ Twitter pages.

    The note stated that LulzSec was going to join with Anonymous, targeting any and all government websites or systems it encountered:

    “Welcome to Operation Anti-Security (#AntiSec) – we encourage any vessel, large or small, to open fire on any government or agency that crosses their path. We fully endorse the flaunting of the word “AntiSec” on any government website defacement or physical graffiti art.

    “We encourage you to spread the word of AntiSec far and wide, for it will be remembered. To increase efforts, we are now teaming up with the Anonymous collective and all affiliated battleships.”

    The post went on to reiterate Anonymous previous sentiment that the attacks are a form of protest against certain governments internet censorship and moderation policies:

    “As we’re aware, the government and whitehat security terrorists across the world continue to dominate and control our Internet ocean. Sitting pretty on cargo bays full of corrupt booty, they think it’s acceptable to condition and enslave all vessels in sight.

    “Our Lulz Lizard battle fleet is now declaring immediate and unremitting war on the freedom-snatching moderators of 2011.”

    The news that Anonymous and LulzSec are in fact working together comes after a rift between the two groups was speculated. An argument that took place over 4Chan’s message boards indicated that Anonymous contributors had conducted attacks on LulzSec after the group released the personal information 62,000 random internet users.

    LulzSec went on to call for any interested party to join it and Anonymous, “Whether you’re sailing with us or against us, whether you hold past grudges or a burning desire to sink our lone ship, we invite you to join the rebellion.

    “Together we can defend ourselves so that our privacy is not overrun by profiteering gluttons. Your hat can be white, gray or black, your skin and race are not important. If you’re aware of the corruption, expose it now, in the name of Anti-Security.”

    LulzSec’s campaign announcement comes just as the U.S. has reported its plans to increase the maximum sentences its courts can give hackers. The new laws — which are yet to pass — would mean that any hacker caught accessing government files could potentially face 20 years in prison.

    LulzSec has already claimed responsibility for two recent attacks on the U.S. Senate and CIA’s websites.

    The campaign was revealed just as the group affirmed in a separate statement celebrating its thousandth tweet argued that it is not a hacktivist group. The alternative mission statement outlined a much more anarchistic leaning, arguing that LulzSec has and will only ever carry out attacks that it finds amusing.

    The statement did not reveal which country, department or agency LulzSec intends to target next.

    UPDATE: LulzSec has since hacked the U.K.’s Serious Organised Crime Agency.

    UPDATE: LulzSec claims to have hacked the U.K. census.

    throw away the key!

    Operation Anti-Security: LulzSec and Anonymous declare war on world’s governments – International Business Times

    By Alastair Stevenson: Subscribe to Alastair’s

    June 20, 2011 9:31 AM EDT

    In a statement released over the weekend the hacker collective LulzSec has promised to unite with its 4Chan-born brother Anonymous in a new cyber campaign against the world’s governments.


  • (Photo: REUTERS)<br>British police officials revealed on Wednesday the arrest of an 18-yea-old teenager that authorities tagged as the mouthpiece of a hacking group identified as responsible for breaching the security protocols of Sony Pictures and a host of other websites.
  • (Photo: REUTERS)
    British police officials revealed on Wednesday the arrest of an 18-yea-old teenager that authorities tagged as the mouthpiece of a hacking group identified as responsible for breaching the security protocols of Sony Pictures and a host of other websites.

    Share This Story

    Codenamed Operation Anti-Security, the statement was originally released on the Pastbin website and has since been tweeted on LulzSec and Anonymous’ Twitter pages.

    The note stated that LulzSec was going to join with Anonymous, targeting any and all government websites or systems it encountered:

    “Welcome to Operation Anti-Security (#AntiSec) – we encourage any vessel, large or small, to open fire on any government or agency that crosses their path. We fully endorse the flaunting of the word “AntiSec” on any government website defacement or physical graffiti art.

    “We encourage you to spread the word of AntiSec far and wide, for it will be remembered. To increase efforts, we are now teaming up with the Anonymous collective and all affiliated battleships.”

    The post went on to reiterate Anonymous previous sentiment that the attacks are a form of protest against certain governments internet censorship and moderation policies:

    “As we’re aware, the government and whitehat security terrorists across the world continue to dominate and control our Internet ocean. Sitting pretty on cargo bays full of corrupt booty, they think it’s acceptable to condition and enslave all vessels in sight.

    “Our Lulz Lizard battle fleet is now declaring immediate and unremitting war on the freedom-snatching moderators of 2011.”

    The news that Anonymous and LulzSec are in fact working together comes after a rift between the two groups was speculated. An argument that took place over 4Chan’s message boards indicated that Anonymous contributors had conducted attacks on LulzSec after the group released the personal information 62,000 random internet users.

    LulzSec went on to call for any interested party to join it and Anonymous, “Whether you’re sailing with us or against us, whether you hold past grudges or a burning desire to sink our lone ship, we invite you to join the rebellion.

    “Together we can defend ourselves so that our privacy is not overrun by profiteering gluttons. Your hat can be white, gray or black, your skin and race are not important. If you’re aware of the corruption, expose it now, in the name of Anti-Security.”

    LulzSec’s campaign announcement comes just as the U.S. has reported its plans to increase the maximum sentences its courts can give hackers. The new laws — which are yet to pass — would mean that any hacker caught accessing government files could potentially face 20 years in prison.

    LulzSec has already claimed responsibility for two recent attacks on the U.S. Senate and CIA’s websites.

    The campaign was revealed just as the group affirmed in a separate statement celebrating its thousandth tweet argued that it is not a hacktivist group. The alternative mission statement outlined a much more anarchistic leaning, arguing that LulzSec has and will only ever carry out attacks that it finds amusing.

    The statement did not reveal which country, department or agency LulzSec intends to target next.

    UPDATE: LulzSec has since hacked the U.K.’s Serious Organised Crime Agency.

    UPDATE: LulzSec claims to have hacked the U.K. census.

    throw away the key!

    Hacker Team Poison group promises to reveal LulzSec members identities: Are LulzSec the lesser of two evils?

    Hacker Team Poison group promises to reveal LulzSec members identities: Are LulzSec the lesser of two evils?

    By Alastair Stevenson: Subscribe to Alastair’s

    June 24, 2011 3:30 PM GMT

    While LulzSec continues its Operation Anti-Security campaign against the world, rival group Team Poison has issued a statement promising to unmask LulzSec’s members.

    The group reported its intention to reveal all LulzSec’s members true identities earlier this month. Speaking to Fox News a member working under the pseudonym Hex0010 commented “We’re here to show the world that they’re [LulzSec] nothing but a bunch of script kiddies.

    “We’re going to let them do what they do. Then we’re going to do what we do”, adding, “We’re going to hit them hard.”

    The claim comes just as LulzSec announced its new Operation Ant-Security campaign. The operation has seen LulzSec team-up with its 4Chan-born sibling Anonymous to help rebel and protest any and all cases of internet censorship and moderation through a series of coordinated cyber attacks and hacks.

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    Operation Anti-Security has already seen LulzSec claim responsibility for hacks and attacks on Arizona law enforcement, the U.K.’s Serious Organised Crimes Agency and two Brazilian Government owned websites.

    In the midst of LulzSec’s first attack authorities arrested Ryan Cleary for suspected involvement in several of LulzSec’s operations. Since the arrest, while LulzSec has adamantly denied Cleary’s membership, the 19-year-old has been charged and appeared in Court. British police were granted an additional three days to question Cleary after the hearing.

    In his statement Hex refuted LulzSec’s claims that Cleary was not a member. Hex commented to Fox News, “You can say he’s one of the people that ran it, you can say he’s a middleman. Depends on how you look at it. I think he’s a middleman.”

    Team Poison has also claimed responsibility for an attack on suspected LulzSec member Sven Slootweg’s website.

    Team Poison isn’t the first group to have made such claims. Already “cyber vigilante” outfit Team Ninja made a similar claim posting alleged names, addresses, phone numbers and at points pictures of individuals it claimed were LulzSec members.

    The individuals named included a 34-year-old Brazilian named Sabu, Slootweg, a freelance journalist named Barret Brown and a U.S. Marine name Casey Gardiner — the truth of these claims is yet to be verified.

    The fact that Team Poison is targeting LulzSec has not been universally hailed as good news. The hacking group has an extremely checkered past. It is believed to have connections both with the Mujahdeen Hacking Unit and Pakistan Cyber Army.

    The Mujahdeen Hacking Unit was the hacking group that targeted Facebook late last year.

    Additionally both groups are generally believed to hold strong anti-America, anti-Israel and anti-India ideologies.

    Team Poison has also been constantly speculated as having overtly zealous religious leanings — a fact that may make several governments uncomfortable with the group’s involvement.

    In the same interview with Fox Hex commented on the topic, “”We’re a group that consists of political hackers,” elaborating “A lot of people consider us being a religious type thing — in reality it’s not. When international governments are doing wrong and trying to hide from it, we’re there.”

    Many analyst’s have already speculated that Team Poison’s targeting of LulzSec could be born of “professional jealousy”.

    If true, then Team Poisons new involvement could be more harmful than helpful. The attack on LulzSec could lead to revenge attacks from both LulzSec and its comrade in arms Anonymous.

    Additionally, as demonstrated by the laundry list of hacks and cyber attacks Team Poison is suspected of, the hatred for LulzSec could turn into a game of one-upmanship, with each group trying to hack a bigger target than the other.

    Team Poison is yet to release the information it promised on Fox News.

    June 24, 2011. DING FUCKING DING!

    Next?

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